David Kadavy
30 recommendations

Recommendations by David Kadavy

David Kadavy's Review:

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, Marie Kondo

Seriously, a book about tidying. In my younger years, I was decidedly anti-tidying, but since my lifestyle is more established, I've started to appreciate having a tidy living space (I rue the day that began).

If for nothing else, I love this book because Marie Kondo writes authoritatively, and I love an authoritative author. (It sounds like the two should always go together, but that's not always the case. It's obnoxious to read something from an author without a strong opinion on something.)

Marie will tell you exactly, step-by-step, how to get rid of clutter, and tidy your living space once and for all.

I haven't personally followed all of her steps, but the question "does it spark joy?" has stood out for me. It has made me ask that of many possessions, and it has made me ask that of new purchases.

I had this question in mind when I recently spent nearly $600 on a lamp for reading. My friends and family made fun of me, but I knew not only that it would spark joy, but that it would make the already joyful act of reading even more joyful. (I have an ex named, Joy, so honestly I wish I could find a different word :)

We determine our values through what we focus our resources on, and if other people will spend $600 on a television that dominates their living space, then I should certainly spend that on a lamp that makes my reading experience better. I have yet to regret the purchase.

I heard about this book from my friend, Liang Shi, who is a smart person worth looking out for.

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

Black Like Me
book
by John Howard Griffin, Robert Bonazzi

David Kadavy's Review:

Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin

In 1959, John Howard Griffin, a white journalist, took some pigmentation medication, dyed his skin, shaved his head, and lived as a black man in the American south for about 6 weeks. He reports his experiences with segregation, racism, and prejudice with this incredible book.

I have an ongoing fascination how the vessel our consciousness inhabits affects our experience. Our size, shape, skin color...everything about that vessel affects how people treat us – especially in more complex civilizations where most interactions are transactional. We can alter this vessel in certain ways – such as manner of dress – and see this in action easily, but many transformations are much more complicated.

Additionally, we are as ignorant to our own experiences as we are to the experiences of others. Unless we have inhabited two different forms, we know as little about what it's like to be in the form we inhabit as we do know what it's like to be in another form.

Griffin's experiment is a good (albeit imperfect) bridging of this knowledge gap, and it's eye-opening to read his account. It was also a brave act. Shortly after publishing this work, he had to move his family to Mexico for safety concerns.

Griffin himself is a fascinating person. He was blinded during his service in WWII, but recovered after about 10 years.

I learned about this book from So You've Been Publicly Shamed, which I learned about from Ryan Holiday's reading list.

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

David Kadavy's Review:

Triumphs of Experience: The Men of the Harvard Grant Study, George E. Vaillant

You've heard the expression "life is short," but clearly, life is very long. Have you ever waited 15 minutes for a bus? That's an eternity! Life is many thousands of times longer than that.

Many of us think of success in small units. What we'll accomplish before lunch, this week, this year, maybe a couple of years from now. But, there's clearly much more to plan for. How do we know we're doing it right?

This book presents the study of a 268 men from Harvard University, with data collected from beginning in 1939, and continuing until present day – presented by the present-day principle investigator of the study. (The findings are presented alongside a similar study of disadvantaged youths, beginning in the 40's, and women from a longitudinal study from Stanford University.)

This study has unprecedented longitudinal data. Some of the findings are surprising, and can run contrary to more limited "longitudinal" studies.

There are surprising things about alcoholism (once you're dependent on alcohol, your only hope is abstinence from alcohol), intelligence (no significant difference found between the maximum earned incomes of men with IQs of 110 vs. 150+), and longevity (it may be that health predicts exercise, rather than exercise predicting health).

This book is packed with fascinating insights that will make you think about the broader strokes of your life. It also talks about what is considered healthy development throughout adulthood (tl;dr: increasingly larger circles of influence.)

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

DEC Is Dead, Long Live DEC: The Lasting Legacy of Digital Equipment Corporation
book
by Edgar H Schein, Paul J Kampas, Michael Sonduck, Peter Delisi

David Kadavy's Review:

The management training program we're starting up here at Fog Creek will take about three years and will be relatively intensive. Among other things, there will be a required reading list consisting of about 75 books (we're working on the theory here of one book every two weeks). We're trying to collect a combination of

  • the best business books of all time
  • the best software management books of all time
  • and every worthwhile history of a software/computer company that we can find.

This is my very first-draft list. By the time we get started a lot of these books will be replaced with better books, I hope; if you have any suggestions please feel free to email them to me. 

Ref: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogCreekMBACurriculum.html

David Kadavy's Review:

 Ellen Lupton's "Thinking With Type" is also popular:(book to learn about typogrpahy)

I feel like it's more focused for people who want to get deep into design.

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Lots of beginners like "The Non-Designer's Design Book" by Robin Williams:

But I've heard it is more of a series of rules, without much rationalization.

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

The Elements of Typographic Style
book
by Robert Bringhurst

David Kadavy's Review:

The ultimate bible for everything about great typography is "The Elements of Typographic Style" by Robert Bringhurst: 

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Often overlooked, my favorite typography book is Jan Tschichold's "Treasury of Alphabets and Lettering:

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

Letters from a Stoic (Penguin Classics)
book
by Lucius Annaeus Seneca

For Whom the Bell Tolls
book
by Ernest Hemingway

The New Typography (Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism (Paperback))
book
by Jan Tschichold, Ruari McLean, Robin Kinross, Richard Hendel

David Kadavy's Review:

Recommended by David Kodavy in one of the google hangouts.

Ref: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t74KdbVxfc8

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Growth Hacking for Assholes

David Kadavy's Review:

Why this $19 piece of junk can be any writer's secret weapon

David Kadavy's Review:

Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

My post in @dailymuse: 7 Lies You're Guilty of Telling Yourself When You're Putting Off Hard Work

David Kadavy's Review:

How to create a WordPress blog (from scratch, w/ your own domain & hosting plan)

David Kadavy's Review:

Listen: Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

Listen: Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

How I boosted my creative productivity 4x

David Kadavy's Review:

How practical minimalism helps me focus

David Kadavy's Review:

Self-Motivation Through Behavioral Economics & Psychology w/ @danariely

David Kadavy's Review:

The subtle but important difference between real and "fake" small caps

David Kadavy's Review:

Cutting through the noise to be an original, w/ @jasonfried

David Kadavy's Review:

New on Medium “Getting Things Done vs. Getting Art Done”

David Kadavy's Review:

Dying laughing. @CAH are my heroes. Here's why their Super Bowl ad failed

David Kadavy's Review:

Why I stopped using bookmarks

David Kadavy's Review:

.@jasonfried on how @basecamp keeps its DNA while changing drastically

David Kadavy's Review:

Stop traveling. Start living "mini lives"

David Kadavy's Review:

Nailing the right idea for your book. A conversation w/ @nireyal

David Kadavy's Review:

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, Marie Kondo

Seriously, a book about tidying. In my younger years, I was decidedly anti-tidying, but since my lifestyle is more established, I've started to appreciate having a tidy living space (I rue the day that began).

If for nothing else, I love this book because Marie Kondo writes authoritatively, and I love an authoritative author. (It sounds like the two should always go together, but that's not always the case. It's obnoxious to read something from an author without a strong opinion on something.)

Marie will tell you exactly, step-by-step, how to get rid of clutter, and tidy your living space once and for all.

I haven't personally followed all of her steps, but the question "does it spark joy?" has stood out for me. It has made me ask that of many possessions, and it has made me ask that of new purchases.

I had this question in mind when I recently spent nearly $600 on a lamp for reading. My friends and family made fun of me, but I knew not only that it would spark joy, but that it would make the already joyful act of reading even more joyful. (I have an ex named, Joy, so honestly I wish I could find a different word :)

We determine our values through what we focus our resources on, and if other people will spend $600 on a television that dominates their living space, then I should certainly spend that on a lamp that makes my reading experience better. I have yet to regret the purchase.

I heard about this book from my friend, Liang Shi, who is a smart person worth looking out for.

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

Black Like Me
book
by John Howard Griffin, Robert Bonazzi

David Kadavy's Review:

Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin

In 1959, John Howard Griffin, a white journalist, took some pigmentation medication, dyed his skin, shaved his head, and lived as a black man in the American south for about 6 weeks. He reports his experiences with segregation, racism, and prejudice with this incredible book.

I have an ongoing fascination how the vessel our consciousness inhabits affects our experience. Our size, shape, skin color...everything about that vessel affects how people treat us – especially in more complex civilizations where most interactions are transactional. We can alter this vessel in certain ways – such as manner of dress – and see this in action easily, but many transformations are much more complicated.

Additionally, we are as ignorant to our own experiences as we are to the experiences of others. Unless we have inhabited two different forms, we know as little about what it's like to be in the form we inhabit as we do know what it's like to be in another form.

Griffin's experiment is a good (albeit imperfect) bridging of this knowledge gap, and it's eye-opening to read his account. It was also a brave act. Shortly after publishing this work, he had to move his family to Mexico for safety concerns.

Griffin himself is a fascinating person. He was blinded during his service in WWII, but recovered after about 10 years.

I learned about this book from So You've Been Publicly Shamed, which I learned about from Ryan Holiday's reading list.

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

David Kadavy's Review:

Triumphs of Experience: The Men of the Harvard Grant Study, George E. Vaillant

You've heard the expression "life is short," but clearly, life is very long. Have you ever waited 15 minutes for a bus? That's an eternity! Life is many thousands of times longer than that.

Many of us think of success in small units. What we'll accomplish before lunch, this week, this year, maybe a couple of years from now. But, there's clearly much more to plan for. How do we know we're doing it right?

This book presents the study of a 268 men from Harvard University, with data collected from beginning in 1939, and continuing until present day – presented by the present-day principle investigator of the study. (The findings are presented alongside a similar study of disadvantaged youths, beginning in the 40's, and women from a longitudinal study from Stanford University.)

This study has unprecedented longitudinal data. Some of the findings are surprising, and can run contrary to more limited "longitudinal" studies.

There are surprising things about alcoholism (once you're dependent on alcohol, your only hope is abstinence from alcohol), intelligence (no significant difference found between the maximum earned incomes of men with IQs of 110 vs. 150+), and longevity (it may be that health predicts exercise, rather than exercise predicting health).

This book is packed with fascinating insights that will make you think about the broader strokes of your life. It also talks about what is considered healthy development throughout adulthood (tl;dr: increasingly larger circles of influence.)

Ref: This  review has been taken from members of his mailing list

DEC Is Dead, Long Live DEC: The Lasting Legacy of Digital Equipment Corporation
book
by Edgar H Schein, Paul J Kampas, Michael Sonduck, Peter Delisi

David Kadavy's Review:

The management training program we're starting up here at Fog Creek will take about three years and will be relatively intensive. Among other things, there will be a required reading list consisting of about 75 books (we're working on the theory here of one book every two weeks). We're trying to collect a combination of

  • the best business books of all time
  • the best software management books of all time
  • and every worthwhile history of a software/computer company that we can find.

This is my very first-draft list. By the time we get started a lot of these books will be replaced with better books, I hope; if you have any suggestions please feel free to email them to me. 

Ref: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogCreekMBACurriculum.html

David Kadavy's Review:

 Ellen Lupton's "Thinking With Type" is also popular:(book to learn about typogrpahy)

I feel like it's more focused for people who want to get deep into design.

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Lots of beginners like "The Non-Designer's Design Book" by Robin Williams:

But I've heard it is more of a series of rules, without much rationalization.

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

The Elements of Typographic Style
book
by Robert Bringhurst

David Kadavy's Review:

The ultimate bible for everything about great typography is "The Elements of Typographic Style" by Robert Bringhurst: 

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Often overlooked, my favorite typography book is Jan Tschichold's "Treasury of Alphabets and Lettering:

Ref:https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-way-to-learn-about-typography

 

Letters from a Stoic (Penguin Classics)
book
by Lucius Annaeus Seneca

For Whom the Bell Tolls
book
by Ernest Hemingway

The New Typography (Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism (Paperback))
book
by Jan Tschichold, Ruari McLean, Robin Kinross, Richard Hendel

David Kadavy's Review:

Recommended by David Kodavy in one of the google hangouts.

Ref: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t74KdbVxfc8

 

David Kadavy's Review:

Growth Hacking for Assholes

David Kadavy's Review:

Why this $19 piece of junk can be any writer's secret weapon

David Kadavy's Review:

Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

My post in @dailymuse: 7 Lies You're Guilty of Telling Yourself When You're Putting Off Hard Work

David Kadavy's Review:

How to create a WordPress blog (from scratch, w/ your own domain & hosting plan)

David Kadavy's Review:

Listen: Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

Listen: Productivity isn't about Getting Things Done anymore

David Kadavy's Review:

How I boosted my creative productivity 4x

David Kadavy's Review:

How practical minimalism helps me focus

David Kadavy's Review:

Self-Motivation Through Behavioral Economics & Psychology w/ @danariely

David Kadavy's Review:

The subtle but important difference between real and "fake" small caps

David Kadavy's Review:

Cutting through the noise to be an original, w/ @jasonfried

David Kadavy's Review:

New on Medium “Getting Things Done vs. Getting Art Done”

David Kadavy's Review:

Dying laughing. @CAH are my heroes. Here's why their Super Bowl ad failed

David Kadavy's Review:

Why I stopped using bookmarks

David Kadavy's Review:

Stop traveling. Start living "mini lives"

David Kadavy's Review:

Nailing the right idea for your book. A conversation w/ @nireyal

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