Malcolm Gladwell
20 recommendations

Recommendations by Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that "Moneyball" and "Flash Boys" author Michael Lewis is "the finest storyteller of our generation."

He considers him a role model.

"I read Lewis for the same reasons I watch Tiger Woods," he told the New York Times. "I'll never play like that. But it's good to be reminded every now and again what genius looks like."

For Gladwell, "The Blindside" is Lewis' best, a book that's "as close to perfect" as any work of nonfiction.

"Supposedly about football (the title refers to the side of the field a quarterback is blind to)," he says, "it's actually an extraordinary story about love and redemption.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gary Klein has one of the most interesting jobs in America. He runs a consulting firm that helps people–or, more precisely, institutions–make decisions. So if you’re the U.S. Marine Corp and you want to train your officers to make better decisions in combat, or you’re Boeing and you want to figure how to design an aircraft cockpit to reduce errors, or you’re a nuclear reactor and you are worried about how long it took your staff to respond to an accident, you call in Klein. These books are mediations on how humans think, only everything he talks about is drawn from one of the real-world cases he’s worked on. I’ve met Klein on several times. He’s a wonderful, unassuming man, with the irresistible quality–whenever you say something–of tilting his head sideways and saying: “You know, that reminds me of . . . . ” And what that reminds him of is something utterly unexpected and fascinating. But go easy on Gary. He’s a Cincinnati Bengals fan.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gary Klein has one of the most interesting jobs in America. He runs a consulting firm that helps people–or, more precisely, institutions–make decisions. So if you’re the U.S. Marine Corp and you want to train your officers to make better decisions in combat, or you’re Boeing and you want to figure how to design an aircraft cockpit to reduce errors, or you’re a nuclear reactor and you are worried about how long it took your staff to respond to an accident, you call in Klein. These books are mediations on how humans think, only everything he talks about is drawn from one of the real-world cases he’s worked on. I’ve met Klein on several times. He’s a wonderful, unassuming man, with the irresistible quality–whenever you say something–of tilting his head sideways and saying: “You know, that reminds me of . . . . ” And what that reminds him of is something utterly unexpected and fascinating. But go easy on Gary. He’s a Cincinnati Bengals fan.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

The Person and the Situation: Perspectives of Social Psychology
book
by Lee Ross, Richard Nisbett, Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that University of Michigan psychologist Richard Nisbett "basically gave me my view of the world. He read it in one sitting back in the summer of 1996.

In his new forward for the book, Gladwell gave a hint as to why it's so special:It offers a way of re-ordering ordinary experience.

We see things that aren't there and we make predictions that we ought not to make: we privilege the "person" and we discount the influence of the "situation."

It speaks, in short, to the very broadest questions of human perception.

Gladwell says that if you read that book, then you'll see template of the genre that his books belong to.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Amazon has about 13,000 books about CEOs. Gladwell says you really only need to read one, "The Opposable Mind" by University of Toronto management professor Roger Martin.

The book "explores what makes great CEOs stand out from their peers," Gladwell says. "I realize that there are thousands of business books on the subject, but, trust me, this is the first to really answer the question."

Martin knows what he's talking about — in his 15 years of serving as the dean of the University of Toronto's Rotman School, Fortune says that he turned "a small, irrelevant Canadian B-school to a legitimate global player."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Opposable-Mind-by-Roger-Martin/slideshow/45039448.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell has said that he'd never try to write about politics because there are already so many fantastic political writers.

He cites the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills and his presidential biography "Nixon Agonistes" as a primary case study.

"A classic from the early '70s by one of the great political writers of his time," Gladwell said. "Written just before Richard Nixon resigned, it's as devastating a portrait of him as has ever been written."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Nixon-Agonistes-The-Crisis-of-the-Self-Made-Man-by-Garry-Wills/slideshow/45039454.cms

Traffic
book
by Tom Vanderbilt

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that "Traffic" is "one of the heirs to the 'Freakonomics' legacy."

Vanderbilt, "a very clever young writer, tells us all sorts of things about what driving says about us," Gladwell continues. "I kept waiting for the moment when my interest in congestion and roads would run its course. It never did."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Traffic-Why-We-Drive-The-Way-We-Do-by-Tom-Vanderbilt/slideshow/45039449.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I reread Malcolm's 'Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession' just to remind myself how nonfiction is supposed to be done. Even when she is simply sketching out the scenery, you know that something wonderful and thrilling is about to happen.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Stone's Fall: A Novel
book
by Iain Pears

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I cannot remember enjoying a book as much as lain Pears's Stone's Fall (Jonathan Cape). It's more adventurous even than Pears's earlier classic, An Instance of the Fingerpost. We should stop calling Pears a genre writer of thrillers and, as we
have done for John le Carré, simply call him a great novelist...

When I read lain Pears' An Instance of the Fingerpost years ago, I thought it was so brilliantly plotted, so compulsiver entertaining, so utterly engrossing that I gave it to my father and
said, 'This is the new Dickens.’ Stone's Fall is better.”

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

"[Taleb is] Wall Street’s principal dissident. . . . [Fooled By Randomness] is to conventional Wall Street wisdom approximately what Martin Luther’s ninety-nine theses were to the Catholic Church.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Fooled-by-Randomness-by-Nassim-Taleb/slideshow/45039451.cms

Personal (with bonus short story Not a Drill): A Jack Reacher Novel
book
by Visit Amazon's Lee Child Pagesearch resultsLearn about Author CentralLee Child

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

It might be nice for [Obama] to escape for a few hours to a world where one man can solve every one of the world's problems with nothing but his wits and his fists

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Personal-A-Jack-Reacher-Novel-by-Lee-Child/slideshow/45039450.cms

Descartes' Error
book
by Antonio R. Damasio

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

There isn’t any description in Blink of precisely how our brains make unconscious judgments. That was a deliberate omission. I felt that Damasio had done such a wonderful job of addressing that question in his many books–and this one in particular–that it would have been foolish for me to try and cover the same ground.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

 Strangers to Ourselves, is a beautifully written book. In it, Wilson asks the question: what, at the end of the day, can we really know about ourselves? His answer: not much. Or, at least, not nearly as much as we think we can know. But it’s a tribute to Wilson, that in giving that answer he is never disheartening or depressing.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

These are both [Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, Educating Intution] the formal, academic versions of the kind of thinking that I was describing in Blink. If you are interested in exploring the general question of intuition, they are invaluable.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Educating Intuition
book
by Robin M. Hogarth

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

These are both [Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, Educating Intution] the formal, academic versions of the kind of thinking that I was describing in Blink. If you are interested in exploring the general question of intuition, they are invaluable.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

"Steven Levitt has the most interesting mind in America, and
reading SuperFreakonomics is like going for a leisurely walk
with him on a sunny summer day, as he waves his fingers in the
air and turns everything you once thought to be true inside out.
Prepare to be dazzled."

Ref: http://www.thingsweread.org/all-booklists/malcolm-gladwell

 

Stumbling on Happiness
book
by Daniel Gilbert

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Several years ago, on a flight from New York to California, I had the good fortune to sit next to a psychologist named Dan Gilbert. He had a shiny bald head, an irrepressible good humor, and we talked (or, more accurately, he talked) from at least the Hudson to the Rockies--and I was completely charmed. He had the wonderful quality many academics have--which is that he was interested in the kinds of questions that all of us care about but never have the time or opportunity to explore. He had also had a quality that is rare among academics. He had the ability to translate his work for people who were outside his world.

Now Gilbert has written a book about his psychological research. It is called Stumbling on Happiness, and reading it reminded me of that plane ride long ago. It is a delight to read. Gilbert is charming and funny and has a rare gift for making very complicated ideas come alive.

Stumbling on Happiness is a book about a very simple but powerful idea. What distinguishes us as human beings from other animals is our ability to predict the future--or rather, our interest in predicting the future. We spend a great deal of our waking life imagining what it would be like to be this way or that way, or to do this or that, or taste or buy or experience some state or feeling or thing. We do that for good reasons: it is what allows us to shape our life. And it is by trying to exert some control over our futures that we attempt to be happy. But by any objective measure, we are really bad at that predictive function. We're terrible at knowing how we will feel a day or a month or year from now, and even worse at knowing what will and will not bring us that cherished happiness. Gilbert sets out to figure what that's so: why we are so terrible at something that would seem to be so extraordinarily important?

In making his case, Gilbert walks us through a series of fascinating--and in some ways troubling--facts about the way our minds work. In particular, Gilbert is interested in delineating the shortcomings of imagination. We're far too accepting of the conclusions of our imaginations. Our imaginations aren't particularly imaginative. Our imaginations are really bad at telling us how we will think when the future finally comes. And our personal experiences aren't nearly as good at correcting these errors as we might think.

I suppose that I really should go on at this point, and talk in more detail about what Gilbert means by that--and how his argument unfolds. But I feel like that might ruin the experience of reading Stumbling on Happiness. This is a psychological detective story about one of the great mysteries of our lives. If you have even the slightest curiosity about the human condition, you ought to read it. Trust me.

Ref: https://www.amazon.com/Stumbling-Happiness-Daniel-Gilbert-ebook/dp/B000GCFW0A

 

The Innovator's Dilemma
book
by Clayton M. Christensen

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I came very late to that book [The Innovator’s Dilemma]. I only read it six months ago. And I haven't stopped thinking of it ever since.

Ref: http://www.thingsweread.org/all-booklists/malcolm-gladwell

 

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

A 5 star review of St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum by Joy L.mkm

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that "Moneyball" and "Flash Boys" author Michael Lewis is "the finest storyteller of our generation."

He considers him a role model.

"I read Lewis for the same reasons I watch Tiger Woods," he told the New York Times. "I'll never play like that. But it's good to be reminded every now and again what genius looks like."

For Gladwell, "The Blindside" is Lewis' best, a book that's "as close to perfect" as any work of nonfiction.

"Supposedly about football (the title refers to the side of the field a quarterback is blind to)," he says, "it's actually an extraordinary story about love and redemption.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gary Klein has one of the most interesting jobs in America. He runs a consulting firm that helps people–or, more precisely, institutions–make decisions. So if you’re the U.S. Marine Corp and you want to train your officers to make better decisions in combat, or you’re Boeing and you want to figure how to design an aircraft cockpit to reduce errors, or you’re a nuclear reactor and you are worried about how long it took your staff to respond to an accident, you call in Klein. These books are mediations on how humans think, only everything he talks about is drawn from one of the real-world cases he’s worked on. I’ve met Klein on several times. He’s a wonderful, unassuming man, with the irresistible quality–whenever you say something–of tilting his head sideways and saying: “You know, that reminds me of . . . . ” And what that reminds him of is something utterly unexpected and fascinating. But go easy on Gary. He’s a Cincinnati Bengals fan.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gary Klein has one of the most interesting jobs in America. He runs a consulting firm that helps people–or, more precisely, institutions–make decisions. So if you’re the U.S. Marine Corp and you want to train your officers to make better decisions in combat, or you’re Boeing and you want to figure how to design an aircraft cockpit to reduce errors, or you’re a nuclear reactor and you are worried about how long it took your staff to respond to an accident, you call in Klein. These books are mediations on how humans think, only everything he talks about is drawn from one of the real-world cases he’s worked on. I’ve met Klein on several times. He’s a wonderful, unassuming man, with the irresistible quality–whenever you say something–of tilting his head sideways and saying: “You know, that reminds me of . . . . ” And what that reminds him of is something utterly unexpected and fascinating. But go easy on Gary. He’s a Cincinnati Bengals fan.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

The Person and the Situation: Perspectives of Social Psychology
book
by Lee Ross, Richard Nisbett, Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that University of Michigan psychologist Richard Nisbett "basically gave me my view of the world. He read it in one sitting back in the summer of 1996.

In his new forward for the book, Gladwell gave a hint as to why it's so special:It offers a way of re-ordering ordinary experience.

We see things that aren't there and we make predictions that we ought not to make: we privilege the "person" and we discount the influence of the "situation."

It speaks, in short, to the very broadest questions of human perception.

Gladwell says that if you read that book, then you'll see template of the genre that his books belong to.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Amazon has about 13,000 books about CEOs. Gladwell says you really only need to read one, "The Opposable Mind" by University of Toronto management professor Roger Martin.

The book "explores what makes great CEOs stand out from their peers," Gladwell says. "I realize that there are thousands of business books on the subject, but, trust me, this is the first to really answer the question."

Martin knows what he's talking about — in his 15 years of serving as the dean of the University of Toronto's Rotman School, Fortune says that he turned "a small, irrelevant Canadian B-school to a legitimate global player."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Opposable-Mind-by-Roger-Martin/slideshow/45039448.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell has said that he'd never try to write about politics because there are already so many fantastic political writers.

He cites the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills and his presidential biography "Nixon Agonistes" as a primary case study.

"A classic from the early '70s by one of the great political writers of his time," Gladwell said. "Written just before Richard Nixon resigned, it's as devastating a portrait of him as has ever been written."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Nixon-Agonistes-The-Crisis-of-the-Self-Made-Man-by-Garry-Wills/slideshow/45039454.cms

Traffic
book
by Tom Vanderbilt

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Gladwell says that "Traffic" is "one of the heirs to the 'Freakonomics' legacy."

Vanderbilt, "a very clever young writer, tells us all sorts of things about what driving says about us," Gladwell continues. "I kept waiting for the moment when my interest in congestion and roads would run its course. It never did."

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Traffic-Why-We-Drive-The-Way-We-Do-by-Tom-Vanderbilt/slideshow/45039449.cms

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I reread Malcolm's 'Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession' just to remind myself how nonfiction is supposed to be done. Even when she is simply sketching out the scenery, you know that something wonderful and thrilling is about to happen.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/The-Person-and-the-Situation-by-Richard-Nisbett-and-Lee-Ross/slideshow/45039445.cms

Stone's Fall: A Novel
book
by Iain Pears

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I cannot remember enjoying a book as much as lain Pears's Stone's Fall (Jonathan Cape). It's more adventurous even than Pears's earlier classic, An Instance of the Fingerpost. We should stop calling Pears a genre writer of thrillers and, as we
have done for John le Carré, simply call him a great novelist...

When I read lain Pears' An Instance of the Fingerpost years ago, I thought it was so brilliantly plotted, so compulsiver entertaining, so utterly engrossing that I gave it to my father and
said, 'This is the new Dickens.’ Stone's Fall is better.”

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

"[Taleb is] Wall Street’s principal dissident. . . . [Fooled By Randomness] is to conventional Wall Street wisdom approximately what Martin Luther’s ninety-nine theses were to the Catholic Church.

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Fooled-by-Randomness-by-Nassim-Taleb/slideshow/45039451.cms

Personal (with bonus short story Not a Drill): A Jack Reacher Novel
book
by Visit Amazon's Lee Child Pagesearch resultsLearn about Author CentralLee Child

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

It might be nice for [Obama] to escape for a few hours to a world where one man can solve every one of the world's problems with nothing but his wits and his fists

Ref: http://www.businessinsider.in/9-Books-That-Malcolm-Gladwell-Thinks-Everyone-Should-Read/Personal-A-Jack-Reacher-Novel-by-Lee-Child/slideshow/45039450.cms

Descartes' Error
book
by Antonio R. Damasio

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

There isn’t any description in Blink of precisely how our brains make unconscious judgments. That was a deliberate omission. I felt that Damasio had done such a wonderful job of addressing that question in his many books–and this one in particular–that it would have been foolish for me to try and cover the same ground.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

 Strangers to Ourselves, is a beautifully written book. In it, Wilson asks the question: what, at the end of the day, can we really know about ourselves? His answer: not much. Or, at least, not nearly as much as we think we can know. But it’s a tribute to Wilson, that in giving that answer he is never disheartening or depressing.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

These are both [Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, Educating Intution] the formal, academic versions of the kind of thinking that I was describing in Blink. If you are interested in exploring the general question of intuition, they are invaluable.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Educating Intuition
book
by Robin M. Hogarth

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

These are both [Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, Educating Intution] the formal, academic versions of the kind of thinking that I was describing in Blink. If you are interested in exploring the general question of intuition, they are invaluable.

Ref: http://gladwell.com/blink/suggested-reading/

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

"Steven Levitt has the most interesting mind in America, and
reading SuperFreakonomics is like going for a leisurely walk
with him on a sunny summer day, as he waves his fingers in the
air and turns everything you once thought to be true inside out.
Prepare to be dazzled."

Ref: http://www.thingsweread.org/all-booklists/malcolm-gladwell

 

Stumbling on Happiness
book
by Daniel Gilbert

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

Several years ago, on a flight from New York to California, I had the good fortune to sit next to a psychologist named Dan Gilbert. He had a shiny bald head, an irrepressible good humor, and we talked (or, more accurately, he talked) from at least the Hudson to the Rockies--and I was completely charmed. He had the wonderful quality many academics have--which is that he was interested in the kinds of questions that all of us care about but never have the time or opportunity to explore. He had also had a quality that is rare among academics. He had the ability to translate his work for people who were outside his world.

Now Gilbert has written a book about his psychological research. It is called Stumbling on Happiness, and reading it reminded me of that plane ride long ago. It is a delight to read. Gilbert is charming and funny and has a rare gift for making very complicated ideas come alive.

Stumbling on Happiness is a book about a very simple but powerful idea. What distinguishes us as human beings from other animals is our ability to predict the future--or rather, our interest in predicting the future. We spend a great deal of our waking life imagining what it would be like to be this way or that way, or to do this or that, or taste or buy or experience some state or feeling or thing. We do that for good reasons: it is what allows us to shape our life. And it is by trying to exert some control over our futures that we attempt to be happy. But by any objective measure, we are really bad at that predictive function. We're terrible at knowing how we will feel a day or a month or year from now, and even worse at knowing what will and will not bring us that cherished happiness. Gilbert sets out to figure what that's so: why we are so terrible at something that would seem to be so extraordinarily important?

In making his case, Gilbert walks us through a series of fascinating--and in some ways troubling--facts about the way our minds work. In particular, Gilbert is interested in delineating the shortcomings of imagination. We're far too accepting of the conclusions of our imaginations. Our imaginations aren't particularly imaginative. Our imaginations are really bad at telling us how we will think when the future finally comes. And our personal experiences aren't nearly as good at correcting these errors as we might think.

I suppose that I really should go on at this point, and talk in more detail about what Gilbert means by that--and how his argument unfolds. But I feel like that might ruin the experience of reading Stumbling on Happiness. This is a psychological detective story about one of the great mysteries of our lives. If you have even the slightest curiosity about the human condition, you ought to read it. Trust me.

Ref: https://www.amazon.com/Stumbling-Happiness-Daniel-Gilbert-ebook/dp/B000GCFW0A

 

The Innovator's Dilemma
book
by Clayton M. Christensen

Malcolm Gladwell's Review:

I came very late to that book [The Innovator’s Dilemma]. I only read it six months ago. And I haven't stopped thinking of it ever since.

Ref: http://www.thingsweread.org/all-booklists/malcolm-gladwell

 

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