The Black Swan
by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
7 recommendations


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Recommendations on The Black Swan

James Altucher's Review:

This book belong to a list top ten books to expand your brain by James Altucher

And throw in “The Black Swan” and “Fooled by Randomness”.

“Fragile” means if you hit something might break.

“Resilient” means if you hit something, it will stay the same.

On my podcast Nassim discusses “Antifragility” – building a system, even on that works for you on a personal level, where you if you harm your self in some way it becomes stronger.

That podcast changed my life

He discusses Antifragility throughout history, up to our current economic situation, and even in our personal situations

Ref: http://www.jamesaltucher.com/2015/09/books-brain-expand/

Bill Gates's Review:

Knowing What We Don’t Know

Black swan events have huge impact, but can only be recognized after the fact. I was fascinated by the idea that if we accept what we don’t know, we could redefine “possible.”

Ref: https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/The-Black-Swan

Naval Ravikant 's Review:

Naval Ravikant's Book Recommendations: A collection of books recommended by @Naval

Ref:  https://www.producthunt.com/@naval/collections/naval-s-book-recommendations

Jeff Bezos's Review:

The scholar argues that people are wired to see patterns in chaos while remaining blind to unpredictable events, with massive consequences. Experimentation and empiricism trumps the easy and obvious narrative.

Ref: https://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2013/10/jeff-bezoss-reading-list/

Vinod Khosla's Review:

A black swan is an event, positive or negative, that is deemed improbable yet causes massive consequences. In this groundbreaking and prophetic book, Taleb shows in a playful way that Black Swan events explain almost everything about our world, and yet we—especially the experts—are blind to them.

Ref: http://www.khoslaventures.com/resources/reading-list

Peter Thiel's Review:

The weirdest idea anyone ever had about the future is that we should expect it to look like the past — but that's what the reigning science of statistics assumes. Nassim Taleb has not been fooled; he is the single best guide to understanding uncertainty.