Marc Andreessen
“I don’t mean you’re all going to be happy. You’ll be unhappy – but in new, exciting and important ways.” – Edwin Land
120 recommendations

Recommendations by Marc Andreessen

Singularity Sky
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Jennifer Morgue
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Glasshouse
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Accelerando (Singularity)
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Iron Sunrise (Singularity)
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Skinner
book
by Neal Asher

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Redemption Ark
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Century Rain
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Prefect (GollanczF.)
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Revelation Space
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Absolution Gap
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Star Fraction
book
by Ken MacLeod

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Execution Channel
book
by Ken MacLeod

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Thirteen
book
by Richard K. Morgan

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Broken Angels
book
by Richard K. Morgan

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

1/Third aspect of valuation of tech companies often misunderstood--this time private valuations set by VCs and other private investors:

2/This topic was recently explored by @Jessicalessin in this excellent article: https://www.theinformation.com/When-3-Billion-is-Not-3-Billion

3/A private company in which a sophisticated investor has bought a minority stake for $X/share is not actually worth $X * total # of shares.

4/First, the entire company has not traded hands, just a small slice of it. So we don't actually know what the whole company is worth.

5/Second, most financing rounds are for preferred shares, which have special rights. Other shares don't have those rights & are worth less.

6/Smart VCs think about startup shares less as stock than as options -- options with limited (1x) downside & unlimited (1,000x+) upside.

7/A share of preferred startup stock ~= A long-dated out-of-the-money call option, paired with a long-dated contingent put option.

8/The contingent put option is the liquidation preference in preferred stock. Increases odds of getting $ back in a downside sale of the co.

9/Plus, in some high-valuation late-stage rounds, there are additional downside protections like ratchets, which can be highly valuable.

10/And, preferred stock brings with it governance rights and information access not available to normal investors. Those have value too.

11/So you can't extrapolate the value of an entire company from a minority sale of preferred stock. Better just to focus on cash raised.

12/In my view there is WAY too much discussion of private valuations in tech. Fuzzy numbers matter way less than real company substance.

13/The best book to read as followup to this tweetstream is: Venture deals

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457021383109668864

what book would you suggest for a founder to gain a better understanding of overall finance?

For venture finance, I'd say Brad Fed's book on venture deals and Andrew Metrick's venture capital textbook.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/588527284010684416

what book would you suggest for a founder to gain a better understanding of overall finance?

For venture finance, I'd say Brad Fed's book on venture deals and Andrew Metrick's venture capital textbook.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/588527284010684416

Rainbows End
book
by Vernor Vinge

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

So what? Well, he's done it again. Vinge's new novel, Rainbows End (yes, the apostrophe is deliberately absent), is the clearest and most plausible extrapolation of modern technology trends forward to the year 2025 that you can imagine.

Stop reading this blog right now. Go get it. Read it, and then come back.

I'll wait.

It's that good.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Last Colony
book
by John Scalzi

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Old Man's War
book
by John Scalzi

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Hamilton

Hamilton is the clear heir to Heinlein in my view. Large-scale space opera told through a shifting and interlinked cast of people from various walks of life, and amazing storytelling -- or, as (accurately) blurbed by Richard Morgan, "flat-out huge widescreen all-engines-at-full I-dare-you-not-to-believe-it space opera".

It's taken Hamilton a little while to find his talent, but he's definitely found it. His two latest novels are superb: Pandora's Star and its sequel Judas Unchained. Plain on staying up late, you'll roll straight from the first into the second -- and they are not short (in the best way!).

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Hamilton

Hamilton is the clear heir to Heinlein in my view. Large-scale space opera told through a shifting and interlinked cast of people from various walks of life, and amazing storytelling -- or, as (accurately) blurbed by Richard Morgan, "flat-out huge widescreen all-engines-at-full I-dare-you-not-to-believe-it space opera".

It's taken Hamilton a little while to find his talent, but he's definitely found it. His two latest novels are superb: Pandora's Star and its sequel Judas Unchained. Plain on staying up late, you'll roll straight from the first into the second -- and they are not short (in the best way!).

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Neuromancer
book
by William Gibson

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Spin State
book
by Chris Moriarty

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Chris Moriarty

Gibson meets Heinlein (can you tell I was a Heinlein fan growing up?) in a melange of science fiction themes, most particularly artificial intelligence, filtered through a distinctly female point of view. A rapidly developing talent worth reading, and watching for future advances.

Read Spin State and then read Spin Control.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Spin Control
book
by Chris Moriarty

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Chris Moriarty

Gibson meets Heinlein (can you tell I was a Heinlein fan growing up?) in a melange of science fiction themes, most particularly artificial intelligence, filtered through a distinctly female point of view. A rapidly developing talent worth reading, and watching for future advances.

Read Spin State and then read Spin Control.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Counting Heads
book
by David Marusek

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

David Marusek

My last and final entry of the top 10 is the one I am least certain about. Marusek is off the charts in terms of creativity and inventiveness -- in his debut novel, Counting Heads, he extrapolates with incredible verve and detail an Earth circa 2134 that is a near-utopia. I frankly need to read it again. I think it may be a failure as a novel, but if so, it's an amazing failure. Well worth keeping an eye on at the very least -- has to win the award for highest potential.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

For history, I highly recommend Michael Malone's "The Big Score". Chock full of great stories.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/623698972046000129

One of the special things about our industry is how intellectually generous many of the leading participants are (no, I don't mean me :-). When I arrived in Silicon Valley in Jan 1994, I sought out all of the written material I could on startups & venture capital. Actually I later discovered that the best book of all was out of print: Michael Malone's "The Big Score". I recommend that one to every entrepreneur today. Also Infinite Loop is great.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479757988832374784

Empowered engineers are the single most important thing that you can have in a company.

Lots of stories of same(context - engineers) in early Valley in my favorite out of print book: -- "Big Score" by Michael Malone

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/420422675425546240

Blindsight
book
by Peter Watts

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Watts

Watts' fifth novel, Blindsight, has put him on the map -- a new tale of alien contact, as conducted by a team of entitites from a future Earth that will send a chill down your spine without even getting to the alien part.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

This is personal for me: I grew up in very small rural town; Kids in rural towns today grow up way more connected to the world than I did. People around you not interested in same things? No problem, screen in your hand connects you to like-minded people everywhere. People around you can't teach you the things you want to know? No problem, screen in your hand gives you all the information you want. The place where you live doesn't have economic opportunity for you? Screen in your hand gives you access to global opportunities, markets. Bastiat's "seed and unseen": What we see are people staring at their phones. What we don't see are their interactions with the world.  And then it comes back around: Our online virtual world enhances and improves our local physical world & our friends and family in it.

Recommend reading David Gerlenter's "Mirror Worlds", on how our virtual & physical worlds improve one another:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479496437399449601

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Dr. James Austin, a neurologist and philosopher (!), wrote an outstanding book called Chase, Chance, and Creativity -- originally in 1978, then updated in 2003. It's the best book I've read on the role of luck, chance, and serendipity in medical research -- or, for that matter, any creative endeavor. And because he's a neurologist, he has a grounding in how the brain actually exerts itself creatively -- although there is more recent research on that topic that is even more illuminating (more on that later).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/577328909189951488

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/luck_and_the_entrepreneur.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca Any books you'd rec on vc for founders? Read through a few, all seemed light on info. Tempted to pick up serious b-school textbook.

@kyro Brad Feld! His book is great.

@pmarca Hah! Was one of the books I read, but reread in order. Grad school made me partial to texts. Was looking at http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0470454709?pc_redir=1411033899&robot_redir=1 …

@kyro Ah yes. That one is good. Also read Bill Janeway book on historical perspective, how it works over time.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/514942579797143553

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Great book that surfaces what's going on(regarding our tendancy to put some folks into a position of dominance and just want to please (and not displease) them.):

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/688467836801421313

In my experience, financial models get constructed to validate the CEO's preferences more than otherwise.This is the book that really crystallized it for me:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/554029604281667584

Perhaps the best underappreciated business book ever written: "Who Really Matters" by @ArtKleiner -- a must read:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/548475249553989634

High Output Management
book
by Andrew S Grove

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Recommended,

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/500912803071283201

@pmarca do you know of anything thats like an intro to the skillset side of running a business aimed at technical people? SICP for business?0

Our standard recommendation is high output management

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/604840255045267456

Which are the best books about scaling a company from seed to Series B with systems out there?

Andy Grove "High Output Management" and @bhorowitz's book!

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/577999958365769729

Marc Andreessen's Review:

My favorite example(context - innovation), we all think Vannevar Bush invented ideas for hypertext and web in 1945 with Memex.Turns out he ripped off (probably) ideas of a microfilm entrepreneur from the 1930's, now forgotten. The best rule of thumb is that if something looks truly original, one just doesn't know all the precedents.

The best rule of thumb is that if something looks truly original, one just doesn't know all the precedents.

This is the book that tipped me:  -- very eye opening.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/436464426279911425

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/462723313723121664

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

Q) Most important tip for a starting entrepreneur who wants to pitch @a16z or any other investor?

A) Read Steve Martin's book "Born Standing Up". Seriously. "Be so good they can't ignore you."

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/497294005239947264

Marc Andreessen's Review:

VC is sub-S&P500 return w/ far higher risk overall, but top 5-10 firms do extremely well over full cycles.

David Swensen, probably the leading venture LP of his generation, talks about this in his book:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/549496475785261056

Swensen is great. 2 books. One tells pros how to invest. The other, for individuals, says "Don't do any of that, you can't win"

Both are completely honest and correct. His advice for individual investors is largely identical to Bogle, and Buffett.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524094177902985217

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Also this book made a huge impact on how I think about the 1930s-1950s:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/662131280310439936

The Alexander Field book is outstanding if you haven't read it. Changes your perspective on things.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/551927991173804032

It's really provocative. He wrote a great paper + also a great book on the topic. The book is outstanding.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/434157491023130624

Tweetshotting from "A Great Leap Forward" by Alexander Field--I HIGHLY recommend it for understanding our times.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/547351777520013313

Marc Andreessen's Review:

“Steve Blank is a super-experienced Silicon Valley technology entrepreneur… a dude with serious street cred…

“In a nutshell, Steve proposes that companies need a Customer Development process that complements their Product Development Process. And he lays out exactly what he thinks that Customer Development process should be. This goes directly to the theory of Product/Market Fit that I have discussed on this blog before—in this book, Steve provides a roadmap for how to get to Product/Market Fit.

“Buy it, read it, keep it under your pillow and absorb it via osmosis.”

Ref: http://qz.com/698242/the-essential-marc-andreessen-summer-reading-list/

Marc Andreessen's Review:

1/One of the most interesting topics in modern times is the "robots eat all the jobs" thesis; best book on topic:

2/The thesis is that computers can more and more substitute for human labor, thus displacing jobs and creating unemployment.

3/At core, this is Luddism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite ) -- "lump of labor" fallacy, that there is a fixed amount of work to be done.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/473209980989214720

Marketing High Technology
book
by William H. Davidow

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Read Bill Davidow's book "Marketing High Technology" for this topic in tech industry. Underappreciated classic.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524782323972063233

Q) Who has written about positioning / timing for going beyond your initial beachhead besides "Crossing the Chasm" and "The Marketing Playbook"

A) Try Bill Davidow "High-Tech Marketing".

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/424541385186750465

Infinite Loop
book
by Michael Malone

Marc Andreessen's Review:

One of the special things about our industry is how intellectually generous many of the leading participants are (no, I don't mean me :-). When I arrived in Silicon Valley in Jan 1994, I sought out all of the written material I could on startups & venture capital. Actually I later discovered that the best book of all was out of print: Michael Malone's "The Big Score". I recommend that one to every entrepreneur today. Also Infinite Loop is great.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479757988832374784

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Re-reading Tim Wu (@superwuster) book "The Master Switch" -- really outstanding history of communication tech:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/442850199409422337

Overall an outstanding book and well worth reading to understand where we came from and maybe where we are going:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/442852973635325953

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Deep thinking about money from anthropologist David Graeber: Debt preceded money http://www.realecontv.com/videos/debt/the-real-history-of-money-and-debt-part-1.html @pmarca

Yep a very interesting book.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/450633045570101248

 

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Trump is just the latest in a long line of demagogues selling paranoia in American politics. Highly recommend book:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/648338682395492352

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/648338477193400320

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/674315087411154944

Head First Python
book
by Paul Barry

Marc Andreessen's Review:

The book that opened the world to me in ~1981 -  http://www.amazon.com/Instant-Freeze-Dried-Computer-Programming-Basic/dp/0918398215

What is this book's contemporary for novices of today? I'd probably recommend something like this:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/486259248431525890

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Universal law of business? "X causes success" is almost always mistaken; rather "Success causes X". Highly recommend:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/638623721532448768

Halo Effect is a very, very, very, very good book.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/465421357639925760

The Innovator's Dilemma
book
by Clayton M. Christensen

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Q) Hey @pmarca is all innovation disruptive? If yes, why the redundancy? If not,what the hell is undisruptive innovation?

A) It's called sustaining innovation. There is also a third kind, discontinuous innovation. Read the Christensen book :-).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/540293122551345152

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Swensen is great. 2 books. One tells pros how to invest. The other, for individuals, says "Don't do any of that, you can't win".

Both are completely honest and correct. His advice for individual investors is largely identical to Bogle, and Buffett.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524094177902985217

Crossing the Chasm
book
by Geoffrey A. Moore

Marc Andreessen's Review:

In tech, the term vertical is to distinguish "focused on a particular industry" vs horizontal which is "cuts across all industries".Generally tech vertical products and sales efforts are quite different than horizontal products and sales efforts.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457618268233023488

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Great recent book on 1920-1933 Prohibition http://www.amazon.com/Last-Call-Rise-Fall-Prohibition/dp/074327704X … --you read it and think, those fools, then oops, that's us today with pot.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/420442813323419650

Rainbows End
book
by Vernor Vinge

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@robinhanson @jackycwong Highly recommended: Vernor Vinge's novel "Rainbows End" -- will prove to be quite prescient.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/481322864029605888

Marc Andreessen's Review:

what do you think caused the great slowdown in Japan (following rapid post war growth era)?

Systematic wiring of the microeconomy and business culture, designed as if that were the goal. An awful lot of it is in this book: Dogs and Demons

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/692971718944690176

Marc Andreessen's Review:

This book by @mikejcasey and @paulvigna is a new must-read on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency!

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/552759207523414016

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Q) Is there a secular way to disrupt that pattern and give these young men and women jobs and purpose so they have no time for radicalization?

A) A legendary book on that topic from another time and place:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/554268052401831937

Marc Andreessen's Review:

That was the original business plan for CNN(a TV station which just presented a bunch of viewpoints + getting cameras into good places). See "Me and Ted against the world" - great book.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/501183937540935681

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Good time 2 re-recommend @cmschroed's book "Startup Rising: The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East"

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/436790849368645632

Chris's book is excellent if you haven't read it --
ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/424067564575014912

Marc Andreessen's Review:

But @bhorowitz's book still makes great gift for entrepreneurs & future entrepreneurs (ages 8-108) in your life :-).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/441104862650957824

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Thank you @patrickc for introducing me to this marvelous book -- "Cybernation, The Silent Conquest" -- from 1962:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/496148850701119488

Marc Andreessen's Review:

the book "Breaking The News" by @JamesFallows is thought provoking and recommended

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/498446928753860609

 

Marc Andreessen's Review:

In a great market - a market with lots of real pottential customers - the market pulls product out of the startup. Another great book very much in the same vein

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/632286737520181248

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Fascinating - what the managers of endowment funds can learn from Keynes doing the same job

There was a great little book on this if you haven't seen it:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524093573696741376

Marc Andreessen's Review:

How does innovation correlate to wealth of a nation?

Great book on exactly that topic! Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/665380372499136512

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Secretive and one of the world's most amazing philanthropists. This book is extraordinary and the story is unbelievable but true. Highly recommended.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/539316243598041088

The Weightless World
book
by Diane Coyle

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Fantastically prescient book on the increasingly weightless economy, free from @diane1859!

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/642970234572308482

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Greatly enjoying @mckaycoppins book "The Wilderness"--timely and informative.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/679274574949646336

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Happiness is overrated. Satisfaction is underrated. One of the most important books I've ever read:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/492112519813541888

One of my favorite books of all time:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/697204476512342016

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Amazing story/book by @jmooallem on American hippopotamus industry that never was.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/418788863302434816

Marc Andreessen's Review:

With reference to VCs raising money from universities. Read Bill Janeway's book -- he's brilliant -- great VC + great economist.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/438221942269566976

Oh Yeah!
book
by The Viking Press

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Long out of print: One of my favorite books, "Oh Yeah?" from 1931, experts speak heading into the Great Depression.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/616454340102877184

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Outstanding book on how we misremember the past: "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap":

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/499438481643298816

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Favorite book on negotiation. Definitely recommend! Some people are thrown by the title. But it's really good.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/487872537452236800

Marc Andreessen's Review:

To get deeper than that, the best book I've read is "The Half Life of Facts". Very interesting questions.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/441780481982332928

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Religion used to be about religion. Now, in the West, religion is about politics, economics, and science/technology.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/598386576335380480

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Outstanding book, highly recommended, tells stories of great Japanese entrepreneurs and innovators in 1960s-1970s:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/463101344291647489

Bad for You: Exposing the War on Fun!
book
by Kevin C. Pyle, Scott Cunningham

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Yep. Why Nassim Taleb's book "Antifragility" resonates so much with VCs; that's what we do.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457018680472113153

Marc Andreessen's Review:

I also highly recommend Mokyr's recent podcast with @EconTalker from Nov 2013 -- an hour of genius:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/498441209153454080

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Rereading "Confidence Game". Valeant in so many ways could have been a classic Ackman short.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/716445457216503808

The Great Mirror of Folly: Finance, Culture, and the Crash of 1720 (Yale Series in Economic and Financial History)
book
by William N. Goetzmann, Catherine Labio, K. Geert Rouwenhorst Ph.D., Timothy Young, Robert Shiller

Marc Andreessen's Review:

And this one I *really* recommend, it's a gorgeous, amazing book about an enormous crash in 1720:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/658941440874016768

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Kevin Maney talks about this in his book:-- transcripts of IBM exec staff meetings are spellbinding.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/490773714800082944

Marc Andreessen's Review:

New book from my friend David Bradford -- great gift for any recent or upcoming college grads :-).

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/466785720393146368

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Remarkable book on the current political situation in Russia: -- sparked controversy pre-pub:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/523695915761008640

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Yep, great book! (context - how to survive a market crash. how netflix, google survived...)

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/456479462465347584

Marc Andreessen's Review:

The route to higher wages is higher productivity, which mainly happens through application of technology.This is quite an excellent book on the topic. 

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/628487640350732288

Marc Andreessen's Review:

I have (seriously) always wondered how they do this. Can't wait to read this book.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/650511646113173504

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Outstanding book on this topic(media thriving on manufactured outrage) in colonial America:

ref:https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/421346365529018368

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Excellent book on John Law's life is "Millionaire" by Janet Gleeson:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/439284491912114176

The Ultimate Resource 2
book
by Julian Lincoln Simon

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Economist Julian Simon and his book "Ultimate Resource II" --

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/527141936168050689

Marc Andreessen's Review:

And the time one man (JP Morgan) saved the US economy single-handedly:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/658941440874016768

Marc Andreessen's Review:

A favorite book: Life: The Movie: How Entertainment Conquered Reality

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/659932472176578560

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Another excellent book, on currency crises and bailouts:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/426940642388742144

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Also this is a good book on the historical perspective:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/658941440874016768

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Sad to hear of passing of great historian Lisa Jardine. Read in her honor "Ingenious Pursuits"!

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/658473697234153472

Singularity Sky
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Jennifer Morgue
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Glasshouse
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Accelerando (Singularity)
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Iron Sunrise (Singularity)
book
by Charles Stross

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Charles Stross

Stross, in my opinion, is first among equals -- the single best emerging talent with several outstanding novels in various styles under his belt and hopefully many more to come.

"One of us" in the sense that his career includes a stint as -- not kidding -- Linux columnist for Computer Shopper magazine, Stross is equally adept at both near-future and radically-extrapolated timeframes, and both hyper-serious and humorous moods.

Glasshouse is Stross's latest book and perhaps the best introduction to his work. A paranoid journey into a world of intergalactic teleportation and arbitrary physical body reshaping will have you thinking twice about who you are, and how you know who you are.

Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise are top-notch post-Singularity space opera featuring perhaps the most inventive alien opponent ever created for science fiction -- "the Festival". You'll never look at telephones that drop out of the sky the same way again.

Accelerando is the best envisioning of the Singularity committed to paper so far. This book is really cool, both in the sense of how the kids mean it, and also in tone -- the plot, which spans about 100 years, is emotionally cold but amazingly inventive and highly likely to keep you up nights thinking hard about where we're all headed in the long run.

The Atrocity Archives and The Jennifer Morgue, in contrast, are highly entertaining shaggy dog stories about an IT guy named Bob who gets drafted into mankind's fight against forces of evil from another dimension -- James Bond meets Call of Cthulhu meets The Office.

Finally, Stross is also an active blogger with, let's say, strong points of view.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Skinner
book
by Neal Asher

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Neal Asher

This way lie dragons... literally, and not like you've ever met before. Asher is an incredidly strong author of science fiction with a distinctive horror overlay. Not for the squeamish, but highly inventive.

Asher's primary work is the Polity series -- GridlinkedThe Line of Polity,Brass Man, and Polity Agent. The extended story of an enigmatic agent for the all-powerful artificial intelligences who rule the whole of human space, the Polity, these novels blend Ian Fleming with large-scale military combat, advanced theoretical xenobiology, nanotechnology gone badly wrong, and war drones with bad attitudes. Most definitely entertaining.

Follow those up with The Skinner and The Voyage of the Sable Keech, and then the delectable standalone novella Prador Moon. One of the most distinctively imagined "bad bug" alien races, one of the most creative and lethal new worlds, and a historical scandal of horrific proportions combine in a whirlwind of violence and battle.

Asher is blogging as well!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Redemption Ark
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Century Rain
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Prefect (GollanczF.)
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Revelation Space
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Absolution Gap
book
by Alastair Reynolds

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Alastair Reynolds

Reynolds is the real deal -- doctorate in astrophysics and former staff scientist at the European Space Agency -- and writes as if Robert Heinlein knew a thousand times more about science and completely lost his ability to write for warm characters. While Reynolds' work is cold and dark -- almost sterile -- in human terms, he operates on a scale and scope seldom seen, and everything he writes is grounded in real advanced theoretical physics. Highly recommended for anyone who likes large-scale space opera and big ideas.

Revelation SpaceRedemption Ark, and Absolution Gap -- together, Reynolds' flagship trilogy -- are three of the darkest, largest-scale, and most scientifically complex hard science fiction novels ever written. Highly recommended to anyone who thinks that sounds like a good idea (I did!).

Century Rain is Reynolds' most approachable novel so far -- a trippy far-future expedition to an apparently inexplicable complete clone of Earth and all its inhabitants from our year 1959. Like Morgan's work, strong overtones here of Raymond Chandler -- in a good way (in a great way).

Chasm City has more overshades of Richard Morgan -- lots of combat, science, and intrigue. Are you sure you know who you are?

The Prefect is just out and I haven't read it yet, but it's next on the stack.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Star Fraction
book
by Ken MacLeod

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Execution Channel
book
by Ken MacLeod

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Ken MacLeod

MacLeod is incredibly creative -- his imagination is second to none -- and he's a superb writer. Many of his books have political overtones that may or may not interfere with your ability to enjoy them. Sometimes MacLeod seems to think that socialism is going to work a lot better in the future than it did in the past. But if you can get through that, his novels certainly qualify as dizzyingly inventive and frequently rewarding.

The Star FractionThe Stone CanalThe Cassini Division, and The Sky Road form the Fall Revolution sequence, MacLeod's first major body of work. Cyberpunk, political revolution, high-tech combat, love-slave androids, cloning, wormholes, artificial intelligence, and nuclear deterrence for hire -- oh my! Join the Felix Dzerzhinsky Workers' Defense Collective today.

The Execution Channel, MacLeod's latest, takes a left turn into a paranoid post-9/11 near future featuring war with Iran, flu pandemics, nuclear terrorist attacks, government conspiracies, and the Execution Channel, broadcasting actual footage of murders and executions around the clock. Haven't read it yet, but sounds like fun.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Thirteen
book
by Richard K. Morgan

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Broken Angels
book
by Richard K. Morgan

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Richard Morgan

Morgan writes outstanding, page-turning, highly inventive military- and detective-flavored hard science fiction set in turbulent worlds where hard men are faced with hard challenges.

Altered Carbon is definitely the place to start, Morgan's first and perhaps most inventive novel, Robert Heinlein meets Raymond Chandler -- and first of a trio.

Broken Angels is a strong followup that tilts more towards military fiction while still occupying the same universe.

Woken Furies completes the trilogy with more hard-boiled action featuring a protagonist who has to fight a younger, and really mean, version of himself, which he does not enjoy.

Thirteen is undoubtedly Morgan's best-written novel so far -- this is an author whose skills are growing rapidly, and this book shows it. Not officially released in the US yet (I just read the British version, Black Man, renamed for US consumption), Thirteen is a near-future story of genetic engineering gone badly wrong -- a future version of all those classic paranoid political thrillers of the 70's but with a much harder edge. Highly recommended. Also very helpful re advising on things to think about before booking your next trip back from Mars.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

1/Third aspect of valuation of tech companies often misunderstood--this time private valuations set by VCs and other private investors:

2/This topic was recently explored by @Jessicalessin in this excellent article: https://www.theinformation.com/When-3-Billion-is-Not-3-Billion

3/A private company in which a sophisticated investor has bought a minority stake for $X/share is not actually worth $X * total # of shares.

4/First, the entire company has not traded hands, just a small slice of it. So we don't actually know what the whole company is worth.

5/Second, most financing rounds are for preferred shares, which have special rights. Other shares don't have those rights & are worth less.

6/Smart VCs think about startup shares less as stock than as options -- options with limited (1x) downside & unlimited (1,000x+) upside.

7/A share of preferred startup stock ~= A long-dated out-of-the-money call option, paired with a long-dated contingent put option.

8/The contingent put option is the liquidation preference in preferred stock. Increases odds of getting $ back in a downside sale of the co.

9/Plus, in some high-valuation late-stage rounds, there are additional downside protections like ratchets, which can be highly valuable.

10/And, preferred stock brings with it governance rights and information access not available to normal investors. Those have value too.

11/So you can't extrapolate the value of an entire company from a minority sale of preferred stock. Better just to focus on cash raised.

12/In my view there is WAY too much discussion of private valuations in tech. Fuzzy numbers matter way less than real company substance.

13/The best book to read as followup to this tweetstream is: Venture deals

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457021383109668864

what book would you suggest for a founder to gain a better understanding of overall finance?

For venture finance, I'd say Brad Fed's book on venture deals and Andrew Metrick's venture capital textbook.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/588527284010684416

what book would you suggest for a founder to gain a better understanding of overall finance?

For venture finance, I'd say Brad Fed's book on venture deals and Andrew Metrick's venture capital textbook.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/588527284010684416

Rainbows End
book
by Vernor Vinge

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

So what? Well, he's done it again. Vinge's new novel, Rainbows End (yes, the apostrophe is deliberately absent), is the clearest and most plausible extrapolation of modern technology trends forward to the year 2025 that you can imagine.

Stop reading this blog right now. Go get it. Read it, and then come back.

I'll wait.

It's that good.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

The Last Colony
book
by John Scalzi

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Old Man's War
book
by John Scalzi

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

John Scalzi

Another post-cyberpunk Heinlein heir, Scalzi writes strong, highly characterized, inventive novels that have been racking up tremendous review after tremendous review for the past few years.

Start with Old Man's War (don't worry, they put the old dude in a young body, so you don't need to find out what it's like to fight aliens after hip replacement surgery). Progress directly to sequel The Ghost Brigades (Sci Fi Essential Books) and triquel The Last Colony.

Scalzi is also an active blogger, turns out!

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Hamilton

Hamilton is the clear heir to Heinlein in my view. Large-scale space opera told through a shifting and interlinked cast of people from various walks of life, and amazing storytelling -- or, as (accurately) blurbed by Richard Morgan, "flat-out huge widescreen all-engines-at-full I-dare-you-not-to-believe-it space opera".

It's taken Hamilton a little while to find his talent, but he's definitely found it. His two latest novels are superb: Pandora's Star and its sequel Judas Unchained. Plain on staying up late, you'll roll straight from the first into the second -- and they are not short (in the best way!).

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Hamilton

Hamilton is the clear heir to Heinlein in my view. Large-scale space opera told through a shifting and interlinked cast of people from various walks of life, and amazing storytelling -- or, as (accurately) blurbed by Richard Morgan, "flat-out huge widescreen all-engines-at-full I-dare-you-not-to-believe-it space opera".

It's taken Hamilton a little while to find his talent, but he's definitely found it. His two latest novels are superb: Pandora's Star and its sequel Judas Unchained. Plain on staying up late, you'll roll straight from the first into the second -- and they are not short (in the best way!).

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Neuromancer
book
by William Gibson

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Bonus: Vernor Vinge

Vinge, a retired San Diego State Univeristy professor of mathematics and computer science, is one of the most important science fiction authors ever -- with Arthur C. Clarke one of the best forecasters in the world.

First, if you haven't had the pleasure, be sure to read True Names, Vinge's 1981 novella that forecast the modern Internet with shocking clarity. (Ignore the essays, just read the story.) Fans of Gibson and Stephenson will be amazed to see how much more accurately Vinge called it, and before Neuromancer's first page cleared Gibson's manual typewriter.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Spin State
book
by Chris Moriarty

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Chris Moriarty

Gibson meets Heinlein (can you tell I was a Heinlein fan growing up?) in a melange of science fiction themes, most particularly artificial intelligence, filtered through a distinctly female point of view. A rapidly developing talent worth reading, and watching for future advances.

Read Spin State and then read Spin Control.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Spin Control
book
by Chris Moriarty

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Chris Moriarty

Gibson meets Heinlein (can you tell I was a Heinlein fan growing up?) in a melange of science fiction themes, most particularly artificial intelligence, filtered through a distinctly female point of view. A rapidly developing talent worth reading, and watching for future advances.

Read Spin State and then read Spin Control.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Counting Heads
book
by David Marusek

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

David Marusek

My last and final entry of the top 10 is the one I am least certain about. Marusek is off the charts in terms of creativity and inventiveness -- in his debut novel, Counting Heads, he extrapolates with incredible verve and detail an Earth circa 2134 that is a near-utopia. I frankly need to read it again. I think it may be a failure as a novel, but if so, it's an amazing failure. Well worth keeping an eye on at the very least -- has to win the award for highest potential.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

For history, I highly recommend Michael Malone's "The Big Score". Chock full of great stories.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/623698972046000129

One of the special things about our industry is how intellectually generous many of the leading participants are (no, I don't mean me :-). When I arrived in Silicon Valley in Jan 1994, I sought out all of the written material I could on startups & venture capital. Actually I later discovered that the best book of all was out of print: Michael Malone's "The Big Score". I recommend that one to every entrepreneur today. Also Infinite Loop is great.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479757988832374784

Empowered engineers are the single most important thing that you can have in a company.

Lots of stories of same(context - engineers) in early Valley in my favorite out of print book: -- "Big Score" by Michael Malone

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/420422675425546240

Blindsight
book
by Peter Watts

Marc Andreessen's Review:

We are blessed so far this decade with an amazing crop of new science fiction novelists.

Writing in a variety of styles, this crew is arguably more insightful, more interesting, higher intensity, and bolder than many (but not all!) of their predecessors -- and in my view revitalizing the genre at a time when more new technologies that will radically reshape all our lives are incubating and percolating than ever before.

So, taking nothing away from authors like David Brin who have long been established and continue to produce top-notch work, here are my nominations for the top 10 new science fiction novelists of -- more or less -- the decade, plus one bonus.

And, they're not all British.

Peter Watts

Watts' fifth novel, Blindsight, has put him on the map -- a new tale of alien contact, as conducted by a team of entitites from a future Earth that will send a chill down your spine without even getting to the alien part.

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/top_sci-fi_novelists_of_the_00s_so_far.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

This is personal for me: I grew up in very small rural town; Kids in rural towns today grow up way more connected to the world than I did. People around you not interested in same things? No problem, screen in your hand connects you to like-minded people everywhere. People around you can't teach you the things you want to know? No problem, screen in your hand gives you all the information you want. The place where you live doesn't have economic opportunity for you? Screen in your hand gives you access to global opportunities, markets. Bastiat's "seed and unseen": What we see are people staring at their phones. What we don't see are their interactions with the world.  And then it comes back around: Our online virtual world enhances and improves our local physical world & our friends and family in it.

Recommend reading David Gerlenter's "Mirror Worlds", on how our virtual & physical worlds improve one another:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479496437399449601

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Dr. James Austin, a neurologist and philosopher (!), wrote an outstanding book called Chase, Chance, and Creativity -- originally in 1978, then updated in 2003. It's the best book I've read on the role of luck, chance, and serendipity in medical research -- or, for that matter, any creative endeavor. And because he's a neurologist, he has a grounding in how the brain actually exerts itself creatively -- although there is more recent research on that topic that is even more illuminating (more on that later).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/577328909189951488

Ref: http://pmarchive.com/luck_and_the_entrepreneur.html

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca Any books you'd rec on vc for founders? Read through a few, all seemed light on info. Tempted to pick up serious b-school textbook.

@kyro Brad Feld! His book is great.

@pmarca Hah! Was one of the books I read, but reread in order. Grad school made me partial to texts. Was looking at http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0470454709?pc_redir=1411033899&robot_redir=1 …

@kyro Ah yes. That one is good. Also read Bill Janeway book on historical perspective, how it works over time.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/514942579797143553

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Great book that surfaces what's going on(regarding our tendancy to put some folks into a position of dominance and just want to please (and not displease) them.):

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/688467836801421313

In my experience, financial models get constructed to validate the CEO's preferences more than otherwise.This is the book that really crystallized it for me:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/554029604281667584

Perhaps the best underappreciated business book ever written: "Who Really Matters" by @ArtKleiner -- a must read:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/548475249553989634

High Output Management
book
by Andrew S Grove

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Recommended,

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/500912803071283201

@pmarca do you know of anything thats like an intro to the skillset side of running a business aimed at technical people? SICP for business?0

Our standard recommendation is high output management

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/604840255045267456

Which are the best books about scaling a company from seed to Series B with systems out there?

Andy Grove "High Output Management" and @bhorowitz's book!

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/577999958365769729

Marc Andreessen's Review:

My favorite example(context - innovation), we all think Vannevar Bush invented ideas for hypertext and web in 1945 with Memex.Turns out he ripped off (probably) ideas of a microfilm entrepreneur from the 1930's, now forgotten. The best rule of thumb is that if something looks truly original, one just doesn't know all the precedents.

The best rule of thumb is that if something looks truly original, one just doesn't know all the precedents.

This is the book that tipped me:  -- very eye opening.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/436464426279911425

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/462723313723121664

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

Q) Most important tip for a starting entrepreneur who wants to pitch @a16z or any other investor?

A) Read Steve Martin's book "Born Standing Up". Seriously. "Be so good they can't ignore you."

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/497294005239947264

Marc Andreessen's Review:

VC is sub-S&P500 return w/ far higher risk overall, but top 5-10 firms do extremely well over full cycles.

David Swensen, probably the leading venture LP of his generation, talks about this in his book:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/549496475785261056

Swensen is great. 2 books. One tells pros how to invest. The other, for individuals, says "Don't do any of that, you can't win"

Both are completely honest and correct. His advice for individual investors is largely identical to Bogle, and Buffett.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524094177902985217

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Also this book made a huge impact on how I think about the 1930s-1950s:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/662131280310439936

The Alexander Field book is outstanding if you haven't read it. Changes your perspective on things.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/551927991173804032

It's really provocative. He wrote a great paper + also a great book on the topic. The book is outstanding.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/434157491023130624

Tweetshotting from "A Great Leap Forward" by Alexander Field--I HIGHLY recommend it for understanding our times.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/547351777520013313

Marc Andreessen's Review:

“Steve Blank is a super-experienced Silicon Valley technology entrepreneur… a dude with serious street cred…

“In a nutshell, Steve proposes that companies need a Customer Development process that complements their Product Development Process. And he lays out exactly what he thinks that Customer Development process should be. This goes directly to the theory of Product/Market Fit that I have discussed on this blog before—in this book, Steve provides a roadmap for how to get to Product/Market Fit.

“Buy it, read it, keep it under your pillow and absorb it via osmosis.”

Ref: http://qz.com/698242/the-essential-marc-andreessen-summer-reading-list/

Marc Andreessen's Review:

1/One of the most interesting topics in modern times is the "robots eat all the jobs" thesis; best book on topic:

2/The thesis is that computers can more and more substitute for human labor, thus displacing jobs and creating unemployment.

3/At core, this is Luddism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite ) -- "lump of labor" fallacy, that there is a fixed amount of work to be done.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/473209980989214720

Marketing High Technology
book
by William H. Davidow

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Read Bill Davidow's book "Marketing High Technology" for this topic in tech industry. Underappreciated classic.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524782323972063233

Q) Who has written about positioning / timing for going beyond your initial beachhead besides "Crossing the Chasm" and "The Marketing Playbook"

A) Try Bill Davidow "High-Tech Marketing".

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/424541385186750465

Infinite Loop
book
by Michael Malone

Marc Andreessen's Review:

One of the special things about our industry is how intellectually generous many of the leading participants are (no, I don't mean me :-). When I arrived in Silicon Valley in Jan 1994, I sought out all of the written material I could on startups & venture capital. Actually I later discovered that the best book of all was out of print: Michael Malone's "The Big Score". I recommend that one to every entrepreneur today. Also Infinite Loop is great.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/479757988832374784

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Re-reading Tim Wu (@superwuster) book "The Master Switch" -- really outstanding history of communication tech:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/442850199409422337

Overall an outstanding book and well worth reading to understand where we came from and maybe where we are going:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/442852973635325953

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Deep thinking about money from anthropologist David Graeber: Debt preceded money http://www.realecontv.com/videos/debt/the-real-history-of-money-and-debt-part-1.html @pmarca

Yep a very interesting book.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/450633045570101248

 

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Trump is just the latest in a long line of demagogues selling paranoia in American politics. Highly recommend book:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/648338682395492352

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/648338477193400320

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/674315087411154944

Head First Python
book
by Paul Barry

Marc Andreessen's Review:

The book that opened the world to me in ~1981 -  http://www.amazon.com/Instant-Freeze-Dried-Computer-Programming-Basic/dp/0918398215

What is this book's contemporary for novices of today? I'd probably recommend something like this:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/486259248431525890

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Universal law of business? "X causes success" is almost always mistaken; rather "Success causes X". Highly recommend:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/638623721532448768

Halo Effect is a very, very, very, very good book.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/465421357639925760

The Innovator's Dilemma
book
by Clayton M. Christensen

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Q) Hey @pmarca is all innovation disruptive? If yes, why the redundancy? If not,what the hell is undisruptive innovation?

A) It's called sustaining innovation. There is also a third kind, discontinuous innovation. Read the Christensen book :-).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/540293122551345152

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@pmarca do you have any recommended reading for a young entrepreneur? Doesn't need to be business related.

Steve Martin, Born Standing Up. Robert Caro, Master of the Senate. Michael Malone, The Big Score.

Ref: https://twitter.com/MANdrew100/status/503364050311729153

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Swensen is great. 2 books. One tells pros how to invest. The other, for individuals, says "Don't do any of that, you can't win".

Both are completely honest and correct. His advice for individual investors is largely identical to Bogle, and Buffett.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524094177902985217

Crossing the Chasm
book
by Geoffrey A. Moore

Marc Andreessen's Review:

In tech, the term vertical is to distinguish "focused on a particular industry" vs horizontal which is "cuts across all industries".Generally tech vertical products and sales efforts are quite different than horizontal products and sales efforts.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457618268233023488

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Great recent book on 1920-1933 Prohibition http://www.amazon.com/Last-Call-Rise-Fall-Prohibition/dp/074327704X … --you read it and think, those fools, then oops, that's us today with pot.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/420442813323419650

Rainbows End
book
by Vernor Vinge

Marc Andreessen's Review:

@robinhanson @jackycwong Highly recommended: Vernor Vinge's novel "Rainbows End" -- will prove to be quite prescient.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/481322864029605888

Marc Andreessen's Review:

what do you think caused the great slowdown in Japan (following rapid post war growth era)?

Systematic wiring of the microeconomy and business culture, designed as if that were the goal. An awful lot of it is in this book: Dogs and Demons

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/692971718944690176

Marc Andreessen's Review:

This book by @mikejcasey and @paulvigna is a new must-read on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency!

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/552759207523414016

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Q) Is there a secular way to disrupt that pattern and give these young men and women jobs and purpose so they have no time for radicalization?

A) A legendary book on that topic from another time and place:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/554268052401831937

Marc Andreessen's Review:

That was the original business plan for CNN(a TV station which just presented a bunch of viewpoints + getting cameras into good places). See "Me and Ted against the world" - great book.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/501183937540935681

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Good time 2 re-recommend @cmschroed's book "Startup Rising: The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East"

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/436790849368645632

Chris's book is excellent if you haven't read it --
ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/424067564575014912

Marc Andreessen's Review:

But @bhorowitz's book still makes great gift for entrepreneurs & future entrepreneurs (ages 8-108) in your life :-).

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/441104862650957824

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Thank you @patrickc for introducing me to this marvelous book -- "Cybernation, The Silent Conquest" -- from 1962:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/496148850701119488

Marc Andreessen's Review:

the book "Breaking The News" by @JamesFallows is thought provoking and recommended

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/498446928753860609

 

Marc Andreessen's Review:

In a great market - a market with lots of real pottential customers - the market pulls product out of the startup. Another great book very much in the same vein

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/632286737520181248

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Fascinating - what the managers of endowment funds can learn from Keynes doing the same job

There was a great little book on this if you haven't seen it:

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/524093573696741376

Marc Andreessen's Review:

How does innovation correlate to wealth of a nation?

Great book on exactly that topic! Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/665380372499136512

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Secretive and one of the world's most amazing philanthropists. This book is extraordinary and the story is unbelievable but true. Highly recommended.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/539316243598041088

The Weightless World
book
by Diane Coyle

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Fantastically prescient book on the increasingly weightless economy, free from @diane1859!

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/642970234572308482

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Greatly enjoying @mckaycoppins book "The Wilderness"--timely and informative.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/679274574949646336

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Happiness is overrated. Satisfaction is underrated. One of the most important books I've ever read:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/492112519813541888

One of my favorite books of all time:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/697204476512342016

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Amazing story/book by @jmooallem on American hippopotamus industry that never was.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/418788863302434816

Marc Andreessen's Review:

With reference to VCs raising money from universities. Read Bill Janeway's book -- he's brilliant -- great VC + great economist.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/438221942269566976

Oh Yeah!
book
by The Viking Press

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Long out of print: One of my favorite books, "Oh Yeah?" from 1931, experts speak heading into the Great Depression.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/616454340102877184

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Outstanding book on how we misremember the past: "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap":

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/499438481643298816

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Favorite book on negotiation. Definitely recommend! Some people are thrown by the title. But it's really good.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/487872537452236800

Marc Andreessen's Review:

To get deeper than that, the best book I've read is "The Half Life of Facts". Very interesting questions.

ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/441780481982332928

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Religion used to be about religion. Now, in the West, religion is about politics, economics, and science/technology.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/598386576335380480

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Outstanding book, highly recommended, tells stories of great Japanese entrepreneurs and innovators in 1960s-1970s:

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/463101344291647489

Bad for You: Exposing the War on Fun!
book
by Kevin C. Pyle, Scott Cunningham

Marc Andreessen's Review:

Yep. Why Nassim Taleb's book "Antifragility" resonates so much with VCs; that's what we do.

Ref: https://twitter.com/pmarca/status/457018680472113153